Was Your Mindset Engineered?

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I Think My Mindset Was Engineered.

When I was growing up, I hate to admit it, but television was a big deal! As a kid I worked my schedule around my favorite shows. I was born in the late 50’s so during my childhood, television was dabbling in the innocence of America so some of the popular sitcoms were My favorite Sons, Leave It To Beaver, Andy Griffith etc. These sitcoms portrayed family life in the “middle class” status. As I grew up, television started introducing family, reality sitcoms such as Married With Children, Rosanne, Jefferson’s etc.

In the 70’s we were again submitted to a deluge of dysfunctional family sitcoms.I was thinking about these sitcoms the other day and realizing how “normal” was portrayed. It was middle class and dysfunctional. Success was “having a job.” In Rosanne, dad had a blue color job. Rosanne’s family was considered to be the “average American family” along with its financial problems and the experience of two “reality” kids. The show combined all of the parenting problems a real family has, but facing it on a daily basis. How those kids behaved showed what I experienced from my children a couple times a year! I considered it to be “horrible parenting experiences” on steroids!

When “The Cosby Show came on the scene, dad was a gynecologist, so there was a switch from a blue color to a white color job. The introduction to television viewers of moving from blue to white was to go to college, then get into a profession. If you were growing up during that time those were your choices.

1) Get a job

2) Go to college, then get a job and make more income to move yourself into the middle class. Take with you the financial burden, struggle, and debt to get the college bills paid. This was how the mindset of many Americans in my generation formed their perspective about financial status.

How Did Television Affect Your Mindset?

On the other end of the scale, there were sitcoms who portrayed how difficult it was to become wealthy or the wealthy were shown as snobs, and quite frankly, ridiculous. Whichever category was portrayed, we developed a mindset of what it meant to be lower class, middle class, or upper class. In the Jefferesons, they were “moving on up to the east side because they finally get a piece of the pie.” They moved from “lower class” to “upper class” but their lifestyle wasn’t what I would consider wealthy! In other words, if living in an apartment on the “upper” side of town is wealthy, it really wasn’t something to consider in my future!

Some of the “upper class” shows included “The Wealthy.” For example, In Different Strokes, a wealthy father adopts two black boys who get the opportunity to live in a mansion. There were lots of “undertones” about racism and the wealthy. The same was true with Fresh Prince of Bellaire. It was easy to relate “snobbiness” with the wealthy. In Dynasty, the “super rich” or “elite” were portrayed along with dysfunction. Again, another example of the mindset of “Who would want to strive for that?”

I cannot list all of the family sitcom shows here, but think back if you are in my generation and some will pop up. Think about how they affected your mindset and the way you feel about financial status.
Television Tampered With Your Mindset!

Television is an indoctrination machine! It was then, and it still is. We developed our mindset of wealth by what we saw from some of these sitcoms, or if we were “entrepreneurial,” we discarded it. In my case, I went along with it for awhile, then eventually discarded the perspective because of my real experiences with “The Wealthy.”

I want to mention one movie. In my opinion, the ultimate status movie that comes to mind was the Titanic. The “poor” people were left on the bottom of the ship as she sank. The first to be rescued and placed on the lifeboats were the “upper class.” Society believed there was more value to the “upper class” people. We do not have to have this mindset.

The Entrepreneurial Mindset Is Possible!

I don’t remember any shows about entrepreneurship. I didn’t watch one show portraying the possibilities we have if we can exercise our ingenuity, creativity, and our innate sense of freedom. As I watched these shows, I was younger and my mind absorbed the messages. It took a while to “step out of the box” and think for myself and realize that entrepreneurship was an alternative. Imagine how many more people would pursue their dreams if they were able to exercise think for themselves and didn’t watch television?

If you have the mindset of an entrepreneur here is the perfect program to find out what it can do for YOU!

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14 thoughts on “Was Your Mindset Engineered?

  1. Micah
    Twitter:
    says:

    Excellent post Raena,

    This is one of the reasons I really don’t watch tv anymore. Over the past year I’ve read almost 2 dozen books or so on everything from mindset to business to personal development. I’ve found this to have a enormous impact on the the way I look at things and the way I see life in general.

    We don’t have to give in to the brainwashing. Turn off the tube, and pick up a good book, or 2 dozen 😉

  2. Really interesting article and viewpoint Raena. I have have certainly seen examples supporting just what you’re talking about, though in my own case TV had very little influence over me – or my sister for that matter. We really didn’t watch much TV and as we grew up both of us were more focused on creating lives very different than the ones we had as kids rather than anything we saw elsewhere. Plus as an artist I was kind of a geekie kid (big surprise there!) and spent most of my free time in my room either studying or painting.

  3. Rick Lelchuk says:

    Raena,

    Fascinating read. TV so influences the population. Mind numbing babel is just what the “thought police” ordered. Karl Marx would have changed his thinking about religion being the opiate of the masses had he lived in our times.

    Happy New Year!

    RICK

  4. Akos Fintor
    Twitter:
    says:

    Hello Raena,

    I stopped watching TV about 2 years ago and since than my life changed ( as cliche as it sounds)
    I realized how society is brainwashed and programmed to things that we don’t even want to do.
    Buy this, eat that, look cool and all that garbage. I got fed up and I don’t want to anybody else but myself.
    Thanks to the internet more and more people are going to able to choose what goes into their subconscious mind. So hopefully the next generation is going to have a lot more mind food to feed off of than I did.
    Anyways, I think your post is a wonderful share!

    Thank you!

    Akos

    1. Raena Lynn
      Twitter:
      says:

      Hello Akos,

      Welcome to my blog. Thanks for you kind comments. I am grateful for the internet too. At least we have a choice of what information and perceptions we want to absorb on a daily basis. It makes a big difference when television is not a part of our lives. One huge advantage of quitting is it gives us many more hours in the day to accomplish productive activities. I don’t own a television either and I don’t miss the negative news. At one time I had the news on daily and it is a real downer! Come back soon! I wish you great prosperity in 2012!

      Raena Lynn

      1. Hi Raena,

        I quit watching last August, I have never been more productive! I keep a TV around mainly for my daughter…she thinks she needs her Disney fix.

        CH

        1. Raena Lynn
          Twitter:
          says:

          Hi Chris,

          I think the new generation is going to pay dearly for watching too much television. It has definitely become an electronic babysitter!

          Raena Lynn

  5. Yorinda
    Twitter:
    says:

    Hi Raena,

    yes, I agree with you Television had and has a big impact on people’s mindsets and belief systems. Like you I was appalled by the treatment of the different classes on the Titanic.
    My parents fortunately were very strict in allowing very little time to watch TV, we got one when I was ten. When I had kids I chose not to have a TV until the oldest was 10.
    With the little TV I watch now I notice how my mind has absorbed pointless information and plays it back to me in strange ways.

    Thank you for the food for thought.

  6. Steve Vernon
    Twitter:
    says:

    Hey Raena –

    I know this is an older post, but the title just caught my eye and I just had to take a few minutes to read it. Glad I did. Boy, did you hit some buttons with me! HA! I had never really thought about how much those old shows had affected my own attitudes toward wealth, but, added to all the other aspects of my early years, I’m sure they didn’t do anything to improve my mindset in that arena.

    I grew up in a family where, although we never seemed to be without, money was always tight. My dad struggled through most of my elementary school years while, at the same time, we had the extra responsibility of caring for my grandmother who was living with us. On the other hand, I was always surrounded by wealthy people. We went to church with some of the “big money” families in town, and my mom played bridge at least twice a week with some pretty prominent and wealthy ladies. My mom also had an older sister whose husband became a multi-millionaire (through his own hard work, I might add), and we spent many of our summer vacations at their home in the mountains of North Carolina.

    All that in itself would not have been such a negative influence except that behind the backs of all these people I would hear my mom make snide or negative comments about these rich people. Since both parents came from very “simple” non-wealth families, I realized years later that I had always sort of been on the outside looking in and, subconsciously, had developed a self image of someone who would or should never quite fit into that crowd. I was afraid that something might happen to the person I truly was. So . . . here I am . . . still trying to convince myself that all that is absolute nonsense and that, as a child of the Universe, I am deserving of every good thing and all abundance that life has to offer. The only reason we should ever change based on our level of financial success is if we actually ALLOW ourselves to lose sight of who we truly are and turn into those people we fear becoming.

    I hope this hits the heartstrings of others who may read this comment.

    Oh . . .and by the way . . . I decided over three years ago to simply turn off my television and get rid of it. The things portrayed on that screen are no more real than the man in the moon. Not even the so-called “reality” shows.

    Thanks for a great post!

    1. Raena Lynn
      Twitter:
      says:

      Hi Steve,

      Wow! Thank you for your sincere and transparent comments! Your story of how you were influenced as you grew up is so interesting! It is amazing how we carry so much from our childhoods. It takes awareness and attitude adjustments to “fix” so much of it! I love when you said, “I am deserving of every good thing and all abundance that life has to offer.” We all are! Please don’t hesitate to return…your comments definitely hit my heartstrings!

      Raena Lynn

  7. Nile
    Twitter:
    says:

    I guess Looney Tunes made me funny with a twisted sense of humor. 😉 I think during my teens when my dad was in Amway and blasting his tapes throughout the car while we went to Amway conferences that I kind of got it in my head I wanted to work for myself one day.

    I do think how we grew up, what we learned, and what we were exposed or experienced do engineer what we are today.

    1. Raena Lynn
      Twitter:
      says:

      Hi Nile,

      I’m sure those Amway tapes definitely shaped your thoughts as a teen. In your case, the outcome is a very successful entrepreneur who thinks out of the box and has uses her talents to help other people. Looking back, I would guess that you feel fortunate to have had great training that set you on a path of “free thinking.” Your dad probably didn’t realize the positive impact he created by playing the training tapes and taking you to the conferences.

      Raena Lynn

  8. Martin Casper
    Twitter:
    says:

    Great read, Raena Lynn. I agree that TV has some very imperceptible, but overtly strong abilities of influence us in many ways, most of which are not good or productive. fortunately, I was very limited in how much TV I watched in my younger years. I was taught to get outside…play and started to work at a very young age, and I am very grateful for that direction that my parents gave me.

    1. Raena Lynn
      Twitter:
      says:

      Hi Martin,

      You are very fortunate that your parents were smart enough to limit your television time, and better yet, they gave you the gift of developing a great work ethic. That is so important, and I don’t see it in our young people as much as before. Many parents use the television as a babysitter and unfortunately kids are experiencing the physical and mental limitations. I have faith in our young entrepreneurs who will become our future entrepreneurs. Either their parents “get it” and will encourage their children to work and play, instead of sitting on the couch watching television and stagnating, or they themselves with the mindset, although young, will get up and go and do it by themselves. There was a part of you that would rather work and go outside, so you did, and you listened to your parents. I see many kids nowadays, but not all, that refuse to do what their parents say and will create lazy habits. I know there are a bunch of young entrepreneurs out there that give us hope.

      Raena Lynn

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